52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 33.

Week 33 – Service For this week’s blog I make no apologies for moving away from my own family to another centre of research which has...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 32.

Week 32 – Library. William Samuel Gregory was born in Wolverhampton on 26 January 1873, the fifth of nine children (and only son) born to...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 30.

Week 30 – Team. George Edward Cordell, son of Thomas Cordell and Ann Purdom, was born in Shoreditch on 26 September 1854. His father was...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 29.

Week 29 – Fun facts. Short and sweet this week! My 8x grandmother was called Grizagon (or Crissagon). My ancestral surnames include...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 28.

Week 28 – Character. Although my immediate family stuck mainly to traditional names for their children, some more distant branches chose...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 27.

Week 27 – Extended family Our ancestors didn’t exist in isolation – they had brothers and sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, and so forth...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 26.

Week 26 – Identity. The longest-standing mystery in my family history is the identity of my paternal great-grandfather, which remains...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 25.

Week 25 – Broken branch. In my first blog for the 52 Ancestors challenge I explained that I was given an enormous head start on Mum’s...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 24.

Week 24 – Popular name. I imagine that like me, most family historians have found themselves at some point sighing at the lack of...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 23.

Week 23 - Mistake. Some bad moves – and some good ones – during World War II. At the outbreak of World War II in 1939, my maternal...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 22.

Week 22 - Conflict or "Uncle Edwyn with the poker in the parlour" It’s easy to view the past – and by extension our ancestors – through...

Jubilate!

Like it or loathe it, royal anniversaries – like royal births – have had a noticeable influence on the naming of British children. It’s a...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 21.

Week 21 – Yearbook. Yearbooks are an American tradition, rather than a British one, so I decided to interpret this week’s prompt in my...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 20.

Week 20 – Textile. With this week’s prompt, I’m honestly spoilt for choice! Even setting aside the various seamstresses in the family,...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 19.

Week 19 – Food and drink This week’s prompt made me think of a family with several members connected directly or indirectly to the food...

A name to live up to

While all names have a meaning, in the past some were apparently given to children in order to encourage them towards a better way of...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 18.

Week 18 – Social. Rather than looking at one ancestor in particular, I’m going to illustrate this week’s theme through three photographs,...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 17.

Week 17 – Document. Following this week’s prompt, I decided to look at my maternal grandfather and some of the documents (physical and...

What were they thinking of?

We tend to think that the quest for unusual and original baby names is a recent phenomenon, but history proves otherwise! Certain modern...

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 16.

For this week’s topic, I decided to look at how negative results can actually be positives in genealogy research. A famous detective...